Man Down

On VOD:
Man Down

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Man Down.  Rating:  1 (out of 5).  Set in post-apocalyptic America, a former US Marine searches for his son, accompanied with his best friend and a survivor. Catch the film on VOD on Tuesday, March 7.  The Chicago Tribune gives the film 2 stars, and further notes, “A festival circuit refugee from 2015, “Man Down” is a genuinely sad film, intentionally and unintentionally.”

Starring: Shia LaBeouf, Jai Courtney, Gary Oldman
Director: Dito Montiel
Rating: R
Genre: Drama, Thriller

 

REVIEWS

The New York Times says, “Mr. Montiel may have had honorable intentions in creating this movie. But what he made is neither a viable work of art nor an effective call to action. It’s a sadistic and ghoulish spectacle.”

Entertainment Weekly gives the movie a D+ rating, and further notes, “Man Down‘s fantastical storytelling undercuts any attempt at humanity. And any good intentions are undercut by its truly horrible ones.”

Chicago Sun-Times finds, “Sometimes we talk about seeing a performance so real, so believable, so authentic, it takes our breath away. Then there’s Shia LaBeouf’s work in Man Down.”

The Seattle Times thinks, “Offering only an atmosphere of deepening gloom and a premise of utter hopelessness, Man Down is like movie antimatter: It repels interest.”

Chicago Tribune gives the film 2 stars, and further notes, “A festival circuit refugee from 2015, “Man Down” is a genuinely sad film, intentionally and unintentionally.”

St. Louis Post-Dispatch observes, “The best that can be said for this film is that it’s short.”

Arizona Republic gives the movie 2 stars, and further notes, “There are fine films that have emerged from the current chapter of America’s history at war, particularly “The Hurt Locker” and the documentary “Restrepo.” But “Man Down” isn’t one of them.”

Austin Chronicle says, “Forgotten or subject to overkill as they are here, veterans still get the shaft.”

Sacramento News & Review observes, “LeBeouf works his tail off, but too many scenes are meandering and shapeless, with only the puzzle box structure of the story left to hold our interest.”

According to Minneapolis Star Tribune, “Shia LaBeouf’s hard work to shed his boyish image gets wasted in a mishmash of plots and styles.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer says, ““Man Down” ends on a grim note, because it isn’t the sort of movie that wraps up with tidy conclusions. It doesn’t want us to pity soldiers afflicted with PTSD, but to regard them with compassion.”

Slant Magazine finds, “Dito Montiel’s silly plot machinations waste a solid performance from Shia LaBeouf.”

A.V. Club gives the movie a D+ rating, and further writes, “Yet it deserves to be said that LaBeouf’s performance is no wrongheaded stunt, but a work of interiorized and believably instinctual acting that could be the highlight of any film.”

The Playlist thinks, “It starts out less not-good than it ends up, to be fair, and for the majority of its running time, it’s engaging enough. Its chief issue in these parts seems to be that the director isn’t super sure if he’s making an action thriller with apocalyptic overtones, a family drama, or a character portrait/performance showcase, so the tone is all over the place.”

Indiewire writes, “If [LaBeouf’s] ultimately powerless to make this film worth watching, his performance is a strong reminder that his work should never be taken for granted.”

Movie Nation thinks, “Big moments drown in a soundmix of sappy muzak. Good actors are wasted, left and right. Classic Montiel.”

RogerEbert.com gives the movie 1 star, and further notes, “Man Down is a bad film, but it’s made even worse by the taste it will leave in your mouth regarding its silly handling of a very serious issue.”

Common Sense Media finds, “The “looking for his son among the ruins” sequences are puzzling for a long time … until a big “surprise reveal,” which seems misguided for a movie this severe. Meanwhile, LaBeouf gives an intense, sometimes treacherous performance.”

Punch Drunk Critics says, “Throughout his career it’s fair to say some of LaBeouf’s best work has been with Montiel, but the director just can’t live up to his end of the bargain.”

Blu-ray.com gives the movie 4 out of 10 rating, and further notes, “Montiel isn’t heartless, but this complicated and urgent issue deserves a more thoughtful approach than the flaccid mystery he presents.”

 

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